Monday, March 22, 2010

3.22.2010 - News

The 34th Hong Kong Film Festival kicked off Sunday with the twin bows of Ivy Ho's comedy "Crossing Hennessy" and Clara Law's "Like a Dream" at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center.
Screen Daily: Like A Dream
Clara Law’s beautifully absorbing fable is a lush and at times entrancing moody melodrama that is highlighted by the quite wonderful performance by the enchanting Yolanda Yuan who plays dual roles.
Crossing Hennessy is an engagingly fresh and enjoyable dramatic comedy that makes great use of its Hong Kong locations as it delves into the romantic complications of modern urban life.

Almost a fifth of this year's exhibitors -- more than 120 -- hail from mainland China, as the growing strength and importance of that market continues to show itself.
Jackie Chan and Stanley Tong will produce a 30-part television series about Yuefei, one of China's most heroic and controversial generals, now that they have secured long-sought Chinese government approval.

The series, "Yuefei," is about the general of the Southern Song Dynasty in the 12th century A.D., who helped defend central China against invaders, but eventually was imprisoned and executed by the high court at age 39. Yuefei's name was cleared posthumously and his story is told to Chinese children today to teach courage and tenacity.

Chow Yun-Fat - Let the Bullets Fly
CRI: Bazaar Releases 'La La" Fashion ! 
Bazaar releases a special issue of its magazine to coincide with 'Go Lala Go!' that includes more golden rules of office survival.
Miriam Yeung and Shawn Yu hope Cat.3 rating won't affect box office

Asian Film Awards Jury President Tony Leung Kai-Fai suffering from eye irritation.
Awards to be announced Monday. (Sina)
Tang Wei at HKIFF

Paw Hee-Ching, Ivy Ho, Tang Wei

Stanley Huang and Karen Mok in Go Lala Go! (Du Lala's Promotion)

Three "Jing girls" in Wong Jing's Future X-Cops
Zhang Li

Tang Yifei

Natalie Meng Yao (HunanTV)

Vivian Hsu was surprised with a birthday cake on the set of Seediq Bale

Director Wei Te-Sheng, Vivian Hsu

(Re)Inventing China’s “Seventeen Years” on Film at the 2009 New York Film Festival
Mainland Chinese works of art from this “Seventeen Years” period have been routinely dismissed as propaganda by the same Western scholars and critics who periodically “discover” and celebrate masterpieces of Chinese cinema from the preceding Republican era or the later post-Mao era.
Mao-era Chinese films are univocal, tedious, and thematically homogeneous.

This rarely questioned truism could only be asserted by the ill-informed, and its widespread acceptance reveals how common is the ignorance of this period of Chinese film history. The cinema of this period includes comedies, musicals, dramas, animation, war epics, historical sagas, traditional operas, children’s films, and spy thrillers...
Mao-era Chinese films are excessively ideological and oppressively obvious, bludgeoning the viewer with blatant political propaganda...

Half a century on, 'Suzie Wong' still a star in Hong Kong
Actress Nancy Kwan walks into Hong Kong's Luk Kwok Hotel, the first time she has ever visited the backdrop to her classic 1960 film "The World of Suzie Wong".

Stanley Ho's daughter, Pansy Ho

Asian casino magnate Stanley Ho denied Thursday that he has ties to Chinese organized crime gangs.

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